How Do I Turn My Technical Content into Educational Content?

Guest blogger, Alynda Brown has advice for trainers who need to convert their technical content into educational content.

Technical content into educational content

You have a full library of technical material to support your new product offer. How can you use this resource to build an educational offer?

A good deal of the existing content can be reused – perhaps up to 90% of it could be reused over a curriculum spanning several training courses. However, if educational material is going to be created then the final content of a single training course won’t be 90% of the existing material. How much of it can be used depends on several factors.

Educational material is driven by the needs of the audience. The role of the Instructional Designer is to pluck out the relevant material for each course from the existing library and use that as a basis for building content that meets the learning objectives for each audience.

Step one: Define your target audience

The first step in Instructional Design is to define your target audience(s). The design of courses cannot take place until the learning needs of each audience are specified. An audience that is interested in sales is different to the support team. When building an educational program each audience type must be clearly defined.

Step two: Define the learning objectives of your target audiences

Next the learning objectives for each audience should be defined. The purpose of any training course is to change the behaviour of the student. When planning a training course there should be a very clear understanding of the behaviours that need to be changed. When these behaviours are determined they are then phrased as behaviours that can be observed. For example, learning objectives for a sales audience may be:

By the end of this training course the student will be able to:

  • Recommend the correct product for use in a high temperature environment
  • List the unique value proposition for each of the target markets
  • Deliver a sales presentation for a new customer

If the audience is going to be the technical support team the objectives may be:

By the end of this training course the student will be able to:

  • Answer the most common support questions from inexperienced users of our products
  • Explain to the customer how the financial accounting for an inventory replenishment purchase has been determined
  • Describe how the product is used to process a sales order for a batch controlled product

When the Learning Objectives for each course are defined these will help to determine the best type of medium to use for the course or courses. There are many different media that are available such as:

  • PDFs for Instructor Led Training
  • Instructor Guides and Presentations
  • Self-Paced in the form of eLearning and mobile learning material

In this blog we're focusing on self-paced eLearning and mobile learning as this is an opportunity for valuable reuse.

Step three: Review available material

When the needs of each audience has been analysed the Instructional Designer is then able to review all the existing content within the library to determine which material can be reused and tailored into courses that will focus on achieving the learning objectives.

Step four: Develop your training

A good library of technical content will provide a solid foundation for the educational content. Now is the time to source material to build the entire course/curriculum, and where appropriate update your organizations technical content library.

At this point experienced Instructional Designers will be starting to think about concepts such as "chunking" - or how to break the topic down into the best size for learning. With chunking strategies in play you can often make better reuse of existing material and it will impact positively on your learner’s experience.

Step five: Publish your training

Look for a system that allows you to readily template your training. As an Instructional Designer you want to focus on building the educational content. 

Standard templates allow an Instructional Designer to build courses using the format that is expected in all SCORM compliant Learning Management Systems. These include templates to create:

  • Synchronous and asynchronous navigation
  • Voice over content complete with closed captions
  • Flip books
  • Linked popups
  • Quizzes and assessments

Templates should provide some structure to the design of your online training and yet they are flexible enough to allow the Instructional Designer scope for their creativity.

Conclusion

The needs of your audiences are the best guide to developing your educational content. Good processes will help you to create new content while making the best use of your existing material. As a trainer in a company with a full library of technical content, look for ways to automate and template the conversion to educational content.

Information on Author-it Honeycomb

Author-it Honeycomb is responsive HTML5 elearning/mobile learning output that reuses content components from technical documentation, operating procedures, and other business critical information and automatically creates interactive self-paced training material. Create and publish high quality learning content in hours, not weeks, by tapping into the value of your existing content and delivering elearning, mobile-learning, micro-learning and assessments based on common templates. Request a Consultation to learn how you can leverage the power of your existing documentation.

Information on Alynda Brown

Alynda Brown has over 25 years experience in the Education industry, specialising in Instructional Design for blended learning, IT and Process Automation. She is currently consulting in the area of building educational content, teaching documentation teams to maintain content and delivering Train the Trainer courses for product professionals